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Stomatal responses to environmental variation among Duranta erecta L.

Sneha Sahay, Jyoti Kumar

Abstract


Stomata are pores found in the epidermis of leaf that allow for consequently water loss through transpiration, pores are bound by specialized cells, called guard cells. Abnormalities present in the stomata such as contiguous stomata, twin stomata are of great importance to the global-water cycle and plant’s ability to respond to environmental variation. Elevation of atmospheric carbon di-oxide concentration often results in lower stomatal density. Inspection of the distribution of stomata in leaves growing in environment with different levels of available water gives clues for the role of stomata in plant adaptation. The plant environment is continuously changing, and stomatal apertures are perceived by the guard cells. They adapt to local and global changes on all timescales from minute to millennia.

Keywords


Contiguous stomata, environmental variation, adaptation

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.21746/aps.2018.7.12.4

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